Denver Sonnets Project, No. 2: Josh Robinson

By John Moore

CultureWest.Org is endeavoring to make short films out of all 154 of Shakespeare’s sonnets, each featuring actors with Colorado connections. The artistic intent is primarily to further CultureWest’s mission to spotlight the local theatre community and their current or upcoming productions. It’s also an attempt to promote Shakespeare education in a fun way. This is an entirely volunteer project with a proud budget of … zero dollars.

We intend to roll out one Sonnet video a week for … zoinks! … 154 weeks. Here’s a link to the YouTube playlist that hosts all the series.

For our fifth sonnet (No. 2), actor Josh Robinson implores a woman a great beauty to consider having a child, thereby extending her gene pool for another generation. Robinson just completed a run of “End of the Rainbow,” about the final days of Judy Garland, for the Arvada Center. Video by John Moore. Thank you Arvada Center, Jamie Ann Romero, Aidan and Fiona Robinson, and Sydnie Leeson. Please support the Denver Actors Fund at www.DenverActorsFund.Org.

The Denver Sonnets Project is a volunteer collaboration, with limited eligibility requirements for participation. For information on how to register, email your interest to culturewestjohn@gmail.com.

Completed episodes to date (in numeric order):
Sonnet 2: Josh Robinson, “See thy blood warm …”
Sonnet 23: Gabra Zackman, “As an unperfect actor on a stage …”
Sonnet 36: Rachel Fowler, “I may not evermore acknowledge thee …”
Sonnet 94: James O’Hagan-Murphy: Sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds …”
Sonnet 136: Lyndsay and Jeremy Palmer, “Make but my name thy love …”

Look here for a new sonnet every Monday. For more information on The Denver Sonnets Project, please email culturewestjohn@gmail.com.

Please consider supporting the Denver Actors Fund at www.DenverActorsFund.Org

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Denver Sonnets Project, No. 94: James O’Hagan-Murphy

By John Moore

CultureWest.Org is endeavoring to make short films out of all 154 of Shakespeare’s sonnets, each featuring actors with Colorado connections. The artistic intent is primarily to further CultureWest’s mission to spotlight the local theatre community and their current or upcoming productions. It’s also an attempt to promote Shakespeare education in a fun way. This is an entirely volunteer project with a proud budget of … zero dollars.

We intend to roll out one Sonnet video a week for … zoinks! … 154 weeks. Here’s a link to the YouTube playlist that hosts all the series.

Four our fourth sonnet (No. 94), actor James O’Hagan-Murphy channels his signature character, Robert F. Kennedy, to morph Shakespeare’s poem from a caution against the misuse of beauty, to a call for the honorable, proper and essential use of power for good. O’Hagan-Murphy is performing his one-man “RFK: A Portrait of Robert F. Kennedy” through May 11, 2014, at the Avenue Theater, 417 E. 17th Ave. Call 303-321-5925, or go to www.avenuetheater.com. Video by John Moore. Thank you Denver Botanic Gardens. Please support the Denver Actors Fund at www.DenverActorsFund.Org.

The Denver Sonnets Project is a volunteer collaboration, with limited eligibility requirements for participation. For information on how to register, email your interest to culturewestjohn@gmail.com.

Completed episodes to date (in numeric order):
Sonnet 23: Gabra Zackman, “As an unperfect actor on a stage …”
Sonnet 36: Rachel Fowler, “I may not evermore acknowledge thee …”
Sonnet 94: Sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds …”
Sonnet 136: Lyndsay and Jeremy Palmer, “Make but my name thy love …”

Look here for a new sonnet every Monday. For more information on The Denver Sonnets Project, please email culturewestjohn@gmail.com.

Please consider supporting the Denver Actors Fund at www.DenverActorsFund.Org

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Save the dates: Late-night Denver Actors Fund parties

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Seth Caikowski and Joel Adam Chavez singing “Can’t Fight This Feeling” at the Denver Actors Fund’s inaugural party last June 1 at the Voodoo Comedy Playhouse. Theatre Karaoke Nights return this summer.  Photo by Kevin Lowry. 

By John Moore
With summer fast approaching, the Denver Actors Fund is happy to announce the return of its signature late-night parties filled with song, camaraderie … and a few libations. Save the dates: May 10, June 28 and Oct. 11.

BCWe’ll start on May 10 with a late-night Saturday  at the Black Crown Piano Lounge hosted by the Piano Man himself,  Dan Dobbins. Grab a drink and a mic. Pick a song, throw $5 in the jar and sing your heart out. Simple as that. Join us anytime after 9 p.m. through closing time at 1446 S. Broadway. Admission is free.

The Denver Actors Fund was launched last June 1 with a fun evening of karaoke silliness at the Voodoo Comedy Playhouse. The gimmick was this: You pay $10 to sing whatever song you want. Or you pay $10 to have anyone on our lengthy list of volunteer local musical theatre stars sing whatever song you want them to, in whatever combination you want to throw at them. I recommend, for example, having Daniel Langhoff and Tim Howard sing “Islands in the Stream.” Let your imagination run wild. $5 suggested donation at the door.

We have been invited back by Stephen Wilder and the the Voodoo Comedy Playhouse for two more such evenings, on June 28 and Oct. 11. It’s located near Coors Field on 22nd Avenue between Larimer and Lawrence streets. We’ll start at 10 p.m. and go through closing both nights.

The Denver Actors Fund has two primary goals for 2014. The first is proliferating the new services offered by its action teams (transportation, meals, errands, construction, child care and more). The second is diversifying its revenue sources. So these late-night gatherings are not meant to be seen as all-out benefit evenings (though they do raise some money for the Fund). Just as important is creating opportunities to  gather members of the local theatre community  for fun times.

For a full list of upcoming Denver Actors Fund events, click here

 

ABOUT THE DENVER ACTORS FUND:

The Denver Actors Fund is a modest source of immediate, situational relief when members of the local theater community find themselves in medical need. For more information, visit our web site at www.DenverActorsFund.Org

HOW YOU CAN HELP:

Please go here (with our humble thanks):

 

To apply for Denver Actors Fund aid: Download the brief form by clicking here

To donate by mail: Send checks made out to the Denver Actors Fund to:
4594 Osceola St.
Denver, CO 80212

 

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Buy a poster! 134 women (and a few token dudes) from the Colorado theater community, all supporting the Denver Actors Fund. The cost $20 per poster (20×28). To order, email your quantity to denveractorsfund@gmail.com. We’ll take care of delivery and payment from there.

Visit our online merch store: T-shirts, key chains, puzzles and much more

Video: Highlights from a Feb. 10 fundraiser held on behalf of the Denver Actors Fund:

8-year-old donates $100 to Denver Actors Fund

Siebert useBy John Moore

We can conservatively say that hundreds of people in the local theatre community and beyond have now contributed to the new Denver Actors Fund through donations, volunteering or other in-kind support. But I think today we can say we have our new youngest supporter of the fund.

Nate Patrick Siebert, an 8-year-old actor who recently appeared as Tom of Warwick in the Arvada Center’s “Camalot” and later in “A Christmas Carol” and Starkey’s “South Pacific in Concert,” dropped off a $100 donation yesterday. Nate and his photographer mother, Laura, won the Aurora Fox’s “Quest for the Holy Grail” contest grand prize, and Nate decided to donate part of his $500 booty to the Denver Actors Fund.

Leading up to the opening of “Spamalot,” the Aurora Fox held a “geocache treasure hunt.” Weekly clues were published on the company’s web site such as, “In order to pass, you must find a shrubbery!” The Sieberts won.

We at the Denver Actors Fund are grateful Nate found that shrubbery!

Thanks to Nate Patrick Siebert and Laura Siebert for being great human beings on this planet.

9727955353_f0a077f510_zHere’s a photo I snapped on opening night of the Arvada Center’s “Camelot.” You can see a shy young Nate Patrick Siebert preparing to present castmate David Bryant Johnson, who played King Arthur, with opening-night flowers.

HOW YOU CAN HELP:

The Denver Actors Fund is a modest source of immediate, situational relief when members of the local theater community find themselves in medical need. For more information, visit our web site at www.DenverActorsFund.Org

How you can donate to the Denver Actors Fund: Please go here (with our humble thanks):

 

To apply for Denver Actors Fund aid: Download the brief form by clicking here

To donate by mail: Send checks made out to the Denver Actors Fund to:
4594 Osceola St.
Denver, CO 80212

 

poster1.4_Cross

Buy a poster! 134 women (and a few token dudes) from the Colorado theater community, all supporting the Denver Actors Fund. The cost $20 per poster (20×28). To order, email your quantity to denveractorsfund@gmail.com. We’ll take care of delivery and payment from there.

Visit our online merch store: T-shirts, key chains, puzzles and much more

Video: Highlights from a Feb. 10 fundraiser held on behalf of the Denver Actors Fund:

Denver Sonnets Project, No. 136: Lyndsay and Jeremy Palmer

By John Moore

CultureWest.Org is endeavoring to make short films out of all 154 of Shakespeare’s sonnets, each featuring actors with Colorado connections. The artistic intent is primarily to further CultureWest’s mission to spotlight the local theatre community and their current or upcoming productions. It’s also an attempt to promote Shakespeare education in a fun way. This is an entirely volunteer project with a proud budget of … zero dollars.

We intend to roll out one Sonnet video a week for … zoinks! … 154 weeks. Here’s a link to the YouTube playlist that hosts the series.

Our third episode features married actors Lyndsay and Jeremy Palmer, who will play brothers (!) in the handicapped Phamaly Theatre Company’s “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” opening July 10 and running through Aug. 10 at the Denver Performing Arts Complex. Tickets go on sale (303-365-0005) later this month. Jeremy is also the director of “Dislabed,” the annual all-original comedic series that pokes fun at all manner of things disabled … and abled. This year’s third installment, titled “Dislabled: Disorderly Conduct,” takes place in a courtroom following an incident involving protestors who are disparate, disgruntled … and disabled. “Is justice as blind as some members of the cast?” Jeremy asks? (Insert your own rimshot.) It plays April 25-27 at the Dairy Center for the Performing Arts. For more information, call 303-444-7328, or click here.

The Palmers take a modern approach to Sonnet 136. Shakespeare’s solution to wooing a woman in love with a man named Will? Simple: “Call me Will!” he tells her. The Palmers turn the sonnet into a dialogue between flirters that takes place, as they so often do these days, entirely via text messaging. That allows for a nice little turn of events at the sonnet’s end.

The Denver Sonnets Project is a volunteer collaboration, with limited eligibility requirements for participation. For information on how to register, email your interest to culturewestjohn@gmail.com.

Completed episodes to date (in numeric order:
Sonnet 23: Gabra Zackman, “As an unperfect actor on a stage …”
Sonnet 36: Rachel Fowler, “I may not evermore acknowledge thee …”
Sonnet 136: Lyndsay and Jeremy Palmer, “Make but my name thy love …”

Look here for a new sonnet every Monday. For more information on The Denver Sonnets Project, please email culturewestjohn@gmail.com.

Please consider supporting the Denver Actors Fund at www.DenverActorsFund.Org

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Denver Actors Fund in Action: Chad Afanador and John Arp

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Note: At the Denver Actors Fund, anonymity of aid recipients is presumed and fully protected, unless and until the recipient chooses to have his or her story told.

Financial aid recipient No. 5: Chad Afanador has amassed an impressive resume over his 11 seasons with the Creede Repertory Theatre, highlighted by his 2010 Denver Post Ovation Award nomination for “best year by an actor.” His roles that season included “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” (Panch); “The Ladies Man” (Bassinet); “The Joy of Going Somewhere Definite” (Stranger) and performing in the company’s “Boomtown” improv-comedy ensemble. Other favorite roles have included Man in Chair in “The Drowsy Chaperone” and playing in the world premiere of Steven Cole Hughes’ “Billy Hell,” for which he was nominated for another Ovation Award. Denver audiences have gotten to know Chad in recent years as Creede Rep has toured its shows to the Arvada Center and Lone Tree Arts Center, including the farcical comedy “Is He Dead?” (Phelim O’Shaughnessy).

"The Ladies Man"

John Arp, left, and his good friend Chad Afanador performing in the comedy “The Ladies Man” at the Arvada Center in 2010. Photo by p. Switzer.

His story: Afanador and his wife, Jessica Baron, live in Boulder. Six months ago, Afanador was diagnosed with Stage 4 Hodgkin’s lymphoma. That same week, Jessica gave birth to their daughter, Edith. Chad has since been receiving multiple chemo treatments while the couple has cared for the newborn together. His wife also works full-time, which means they have the blessing of health insurance, but must keep to a busy schedule. When you are battling Stage 4 cancer, going about the business of simple daily chores like making meals can be a burden. Award-winning actor John Arp is a master chef (literally), and a member of the Denver Actors Fund’s new 2014 Meal Prep volunteer Action Team. Chad and John (currently appearing in the Denver Center Theatre Company’s “Shadowlands”) have performed together for many summers at Creede Rep. Months ago, while our Denver Actors Fund Action Teams were just in the beginning planning stages, John Arp undertook the loving task of preparing meals for the Afanadors on an ongoing basis. Really good ones. Healthy ones that best support Chad’s recovery. But food supplies cost money.

How we will help: We are happy to report that Chad’s chemo is working, but he is scheduled for another three tough months of treatments. In granting John Arp’s request for aid, we at the Denver Actors Fund hope to accomplish two goals: We would like to help defer John’s out-of-pocket costs so that he can continue to prepare regular meals for the Afanadors for the next seven weeks, at which time John will leave to perform in the summer season at Creede. And we want to do whatever we can to help keep Chad’s focus on fighting — and winning — his fight. So the Denver Actors Fund has approved a $300 stipend for the express purpose of helping to pay for food supplies. When Arp leaves for Creede, we hope we can either transition his work over to the Denver Actors Fund’s new Meal Prep and Delivery Action Team, or find other ways our volunteers can help the Afanador family.

A message from Chad: “I was delighted to hear about the grant from the Denver Actors Fund. It was a strange coincidence that I heard a great story about the Fund on Colorado Public Radio yesterday. Just to start, thank you for the grant to pay John. He has been very cagey about taking money from us, and we are eternally grateful. Having John cook for us has been life-saving. I have quite a few days in my cycle with fatigue, and then some follow with just a little less vigor than I would like. That’s chemo, but it is working, so I am grateful to have it. He has really gone out of his way for Jessica and me during this time, and his endurance is what we most admire. We are very lucky that my wife works for CU. I am getting tremendous care at UC hospital, and her insurance is great. So I am one of the fortunate ones. But many of our friends and colleagues have sporadic or no care. Thank you so much for starting the Denver Actors Fund to help those people. My only advice is get all your lumps checked out: It is the only symptom I had when my cancer had already reached stage 4.”

Update: Replenishment is the source of life for the Denver Actors Fund, and you wonderful people have embodied that this week with your response to the story of actor Chad Afanador. We paid $300 out, you kicked $610 back in. Thank you to friends new and old … The Beechum Family; the Peterson Family; TSW, Anne Medlock, Eli Rtahbun; Natalie Maynard; Mare Trevathan & Eryc Eyl; Dyarl Alexander, and two anons … for making what we are trying to do here feel so right.

chad message

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HOW YOU CAN HELP:

The Denver Actors Fund is a modest source of immediate, situational relief when members of the local theater community find themselves in medical need.  For more information, visit our web site at www.DenverActorsFund.Org

How you can donate to the Denver Actors Fund: Please go here (with our humble thanks):

 

To apply for Denver Actors Fund aid: Download the brief form by clicking here

To donate by mail: Send checks made out to the Denver Actors Fund to:
4594 Osceola St.
Denver, CO 80212

 

poster1.4_Cross

Buy a poster! 134 women (and a few token dudes) from the Colorado theater community, all supporting the Denver Actors Fund. The cost $20 per poster (20×28). To order, email your quantity to denveractorsfund@gmail.com. We’ll take care of delivery and payment from there.

Visit our online merch store: T-shirts, key chains, puzzles and much more

Video: Highlights from a Feb. 10 fundraiser held on behalf of the Denver Actors Fund:

Denver Sonnets Project, No. 23: Gabra Zackman

By John Moore

CultureWest.Org is endeavoring to make short films out of all 154 of Shakespeare’s sonnets, each featuring actors with Colorado connections. The artistic intent is primarily to further CultureWest’s founding and ongoing mission to spotlight members of the local theatre community and the companies they perform for, while also calling attention to their current or recent productions. It’s also an attempt to promote Shakespeare education in a fun way. This is an entirely volunteer project with a proud budget of … zero dollars.

We intend to roll out one Sonnet video a week for … zoinks! … 154 weeks. Here’s a link to the YouTube playlist that eventually will host all 154 short films.

Our second featured actor is Gabra Zackman, recently of “Tomorrow in the Battle” in the Grant-Humphreys Mansion. She’s taking on Sonnet 23, in which a woman tells a man she loves not to trust what she says, but rather what she writes. It was filmed at Civic Center Park.

Completed episodes:
Sonnet 23: Gabra Zackman, “As an unperfect actor on a stage …”
Sonnet 36: Rachel Fowler, “I may not evermore acknowledge thee …”

Look here for a new sonnet every Monday. For more information on The Denver Sonnets Project, please email culturewestjohn@gmail.com.

Please consider supporting the Denver Actors Fund at www.DenverActorsFund.Org

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